Hard Soft Laap Sau

Master Tse’s Wing Chun Notes #25

Hard and Soft Laap Sau 擸手

Hard Soft Laap SauWhen using Laap Sau 擸手, we can use different kinds of energy. If we want to pull our opponent with Laap Sau, we should do it quickly so he does not have enough time to defend against it. That is Hard Laap Sau. We can also hold the arm without doing anything with it. This can irritate our opponent and make them tense up. That is Soft Laap Sau. Many seniors, when they do Chi Sau 黐手 they like to hold onto their opponent’s forearm(s), sometimes using one hand and sometimes two hands. This makes the opponent irritated and uncomfortable and makes them use more strength which we can then use against them.
So it is so important when using Laap Sau to feel or read the opponent’s energy. If they are tense, we can pull them quickly and hit them, but if they are soft and weak, we can hold their forearm and see what happens. Then we can decide whether to hit or pull or even change our hand to get a better position. Reading the opponent’s energy is so important.

Michael Tse

4 replies
  1. Simon
    Simon says:

    Hi Sigong,

    Thank you for another great article. Reading the opponents energy has become a bigger and bigger part of my Chi-Sau, I have found in the past that if you use a soft Laap Sau when the opponent is strong they can just ‘go through ‘ it and using a hard Laap Sau when the opponent is soft, used to mean I had over committed my own energy without taking enough notice of what my opponent was doing.

    Best wishes and kind regards,
    Simon.

    Reply
  2. Simon
    Simon says:

    Hi Sigong,

    Thank you for another great article. Reading the opponents energy has become a bigger and bigger part of my Chi-Sau, I have found in the past that if you use a soft Laap Sau when the opponent is strong they can just ‘go through ‘ it and using a hard Laap Sau when the opponent is soft, used to mean I had over committed my own energy without taking enough notice of what my opponent was doing.

    Best wishes and kind regards,
    Simon.

    Reply
    • Simon
      Simon says:

      Hi Sigong,

      Thank you for your reply, and thank you for the opportunities for real chi-sau practice. So many times I see people concentrating on trying to hit their opponent or ‘score points’ against them. I often wonder how much they actually learn when they are concentrating on ‘getting’ the opponent rather than concentrating on the Wing Chun skill.

      Kind regards,
      Simon.

      Reply

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